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British Values

What are British values?

 

According to Ofsted, British values are:

  • democracy;
  • the rule of law;
  • individual liberty;
  • mutual respect for and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs and for those without faith.

    Every school in England must promote British values.

At Haddon we promote the British Values in a variety of ways including:

 

DREAM Values

At Haddon our DREAM values are embedded throughout everything we do and aim to support both the academic and social elements, including promotion of British Values, of their school life. Our DREAM values are: D – Determined, R – Respect, E –Enjoy, A – Achieve and M – Make memories.

 

As well as these we uphold and promote the values of the Flying High Trust which are: Enjoyment, Pride, Responsibility, Creativity, Aspiration, Confidence and Perseverance.

 

Democracy

Pupil voice is the key instrument for delivering democracy at Haddon. At the

start of the academic year all classes decide their rules for behaviour.

Our active School council is chosen following the children making nominations, nominated candidates making speeches to explain their manifestos and suitability for the role and then carrying out a full ballot with all children using ‘official’ ballot papers. We also carry out mock elections and use ballot papers for a variety of other important school decisions e.g. guinea pig naming. Two members of the school council also take part in a termly School Parliament with representatives from all of the Trust schools, to discuss our values and make decisions on behalf of the children within the Flying High Trust.

 

The Rule of Law

The importance of Laws, whether they are those that govern the class, the school, or the country, are embedded in the Haddon curriculum. Our pupils are taught the value and reasons for keeping our agreed rules as they govern and protect our community. The children are encouraged to accept responsibility for their actions; they may make mistakes but must learn from them.

Visits from authorities such as the Police, Fire Service etc. as well as taking part in DARE and CASE help us to ensure that the children know that there are laws that govern and protect us, the responsibilities that this involves and the consequences when laws are broken. These are regularly discussed during assemblies and PSHE lessons.

 

Individual Liberty

Pupil's personal development and well-being is at the heart of what makes Haddon Primary and Nursery distinctive and is a real strength to the school. At Haddon, pupils are actively encouraged to make choices, knowing that they are in a safe and supportive environment. As a school we educate and provide boundaries for the children to make informed choices, through a safe environment and an empowering education. Pupils are encouraged to know that with rights comes responsibility. They are taught to value their personal freedoms and protect it.

 

Mutual Respect

Mutual respect is at the heart of Haddon’s values. Children learn that their behaviours have an effect on their own rights and those of others. All members of the school community are expected to treat each other with respect. This is reflected in one of our DREAM values which supports the use of polite language both inside and outside the classroom. We make every effort to challenge incidents of prejudice, bullying and harassment. Our behaviour code and behaviour policy enables us to monitor whether pupils from particular groups are more likely to be excluded or disciplined than others.

 

Tolerance of those of Different Faiths and Beliefs

Haddon Primary serves pupils that are largely white British. As a consequence we have created a curriculum which promotes common values and builds pupils’ understanding of the diversity that surrounds them. It recognises and celebrates the similarities and differences between cultures, faiths, ethnicities and socio-economic backgrounds. Opportunities are offered to discuss issues of identity and diversity to enable pupils to explore differences and challenge prejudice and stereotyping. Pupils’ understanding is enriched through visits to different places of worship and meeting members from different faith communities (Islam, Hinduism, Christianity and Judaism). We have also formed a link with a school in Uganda and the children regularly enjoy writing to and receiving letters from their friends on the other side of the world, they are always particularly interested to find out more about the differences to their schooling and our own.